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March 25, 2014
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Letter: Exercise your right to representation

Vote — it really matters

Our Founding Fathers had no intent to establish a true democracy when they crafted our Constitution. John Adams, our first vice president and second president, was counseled by his wife, Abigail. She advised him in a letter to “remember the ladies … we ladies will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice.” John replied by letter, “to open the question would prove too fruitful a source of controversy and Altercation. There will be no end of it. New claims will arise. Women will demand a vote. Lads from 12 to 21 will think their rights not enough tended to, and every man, who has not a farthing, will demand an equal voice with any other in all acts.”

Clearly our founders did not intend for men with no wealth, women, slaves, or Native Americans to participate in a democratic process in which all persons are guaranteed an equal voice by vote. All these groups have since obtained this right, but it has only been through actual violence and conflict. We currently have individuals who would limit these groups an equal voice. Possibly they would like to return to the original intent of our Constitution and dismiss the social evolution of equality for all in secular affairs.

Our representative form of government requires citizen participation to be effective. Vote by mail makes the act very convenient. Remember, we vote for people to represent our interests at all levels, from city council to Legislature to Congress. Only a few local issues such as budgets or levies are voted on directly and occasionally a referendum when our representatives are too timid to address an issue.

Vote; it wasn’t always a right or so easy.

Stephen Truesdell

Roseburg


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The News-Review Updated Mar 25, 2014 01:16PM Published Mar 25, 2014 01:16PM Copyright 2014 The News-Review. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.