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February 26, 2013
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Letter: Demonstrate human compassion in social justice

Social justice

The true meaning of being a social individual is to live in an organized community instead of living solitary.

An uncle of mine lives in New York City. He uses his social work career to teach mentally challenged young people to learn the NYC subway system, to shop for and cook their food, and displays great pride when describing his charges. A truly contagious sight.

I have a Midwestern friend who lives with the dreaded disease, AIDS. He collects Social Security disability so that he may live with dignity. For many people, this is living on the dole and drawing monies from our state and federal treasuries that many conservatives count as their 47 percent of the population pulling down America.

There are times when a benevolent entity helps those who cannot help themselves. That’s what you call living in a civilized society. Those who resent this help haven’t suffered a debilitating sickness, the loss of a job or the destruction of one’s home due to natural causes. They’re not aware of such losses and how to deal with them. At those times, you tend to turn to anyone who says, “I can help you.”

The people who smile at you on the street or in a store, without knowing who you are, they’re the ones who will help without a second thought.

Calling a person of this caliber a Socialist or a Communist is a horrible inference, and I’m aghast at how many of these name-callers live in Douglas County. It is rather distasteful to resent those people who attend food banks, collect unemployment and would probably die without Medicare and Medicaid. Denying the poor and middle class of such government help is pure evil and downright lacking of any human compassion.

Sheila Lawrence

Roseburg


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The News-Review Updated Mar 27, 2013 08:49AM Published Feb 26, 2013 04:24PM Copyright 2013 The News-Review. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.