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Roseburg Forest Products’ mill in Dillard on Tuesday.

Roseburg Forest Products laid off approximately 90 employees at its plywood plant in Dillard on Friday morning.

Rebecca Taylor, a spokeswoman for the company, said continued unfavorable conditions in the North American plywood market contributed to the decision.

The company was able to extend immediate job offers to approximately 50 of the affected employees for roles at the company’s other wood products plant. Those employees will retain seniority, benefits and will have “recall rights” to return to their position at the Dillard location if their position reopens.

The company will consider the 40 employees who were not offered transfers first for positions if they open up. Employees will learn more at crew meetings at the plant throughout the day.

“After waiting for months for markets to improve, we have reached the point where a layoff is necessary to better match supply with weakened demand,” Senior RFP Vice President of Operations Jake Elston said in a press release. “Slow housing starts, imported plywood, and increased competition from OSB manufacturers are all driving the imbalance in the market.

“This is an unfortunate but necessary step toward preserving the long-term viability of our plywood business.”

Taylor said the company tried to correct the market imbalance with temporary plant shutdowns over the week of the Fourth of July, but it wasn’t enough.

“They definitely have seen some market trends affecting the plant,” Taylor said. “But, as far as this announcement, it was first made today.”

The plywood plant had close to 350 employees before Friday morning’s layoffs and transfers.

Most of the layoffs came from the softwood plywood team. All of the softwood plywood dryer shifts and softwood plywood relief and night shifts for layup lines were laid off, Taylor said.

Janelle Polcyn can be reached at jpolcyn@nrtoday.com or 541-957-4204. Or follow her on Twitter @JanellePolcyn.

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Janelle Polcyn is a reporter at The News-Review, graduated from the University of Texas, and is a podcast enthusiast.

(1) comment

Creeksend

It isn't about a shortage of trees ...it NEVER is.

This Boom and Bust economy has persisted for the entire time TIMBER has been king.

Douglas County is a "poverty trap"

Poverty Trap

REVIEWED BY JAMES CHEN Updated Apr 26, 2019

What is a Poverty Trap?

"A poverty trap is a mechanism that makes it very difficult for people to escape poverty. A poverty trap is created when an economic system requires a significant amount of capital in order to earn enough to escape poverty. When individuals lack this capital, they may also find it difficult to acquire it, creating a self-reinforcing cycle of poverty.

Understanding Poverty Traps

Many factors contribute to creating a poverty trap, including: limited access to credit and capital markets, extreme environmental degradation (which depletes agricultural production potential), corrupt governance, capital flight, poor education systems, disease ecology, lack of public health care, and poor infrastructure."

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