In the first two parts we covered topics like assessments, having a realistic plan, and being good for your word as ways to get and stay motivated to move.

Today I’d like to talk about failure.

a. Do you need a Plan B?

b. Do you need to up the ante?

Oh my goodness, ya’ll, sometimes shift happens. In fact, it is guaranteed to happen! So you must have a Plan B for those times when you absolutely can’t stick to your exercise and nutrition plan, no matter how important your goals are.

The cool thing about Plan B is: It’s a PLAN. Yes, it’s a legal clause in your goal-setting intentions that allows for an alternate set of exercises and an alternate combination of foods when things like the in-laws come to visit, or a snow storm hits.

Right? So, enjoy a small piece of cheesecake with family on your husband’s 50th. Shovel snow off the driveway instead of squats and bench presses in the gym. It’s all good. It doesn’t mean you abandon all hope for success. It doesn’t mean that now you have to quit. It doesn’t mean you have to start all over. It’s just Plan B.

However, that said: it IS Plan B and NOT Plan A. So when everything settles, the in-laws leave, the streets are clear: you are back to Plan A with vegetables at every meal and building muscle in the gym.

On the other hand, dear athletes. Do you need to up the ante?

If you want to drop sizes, SAY IT. You can’t claim “failure” if you haven’t even been straight with yourself about what you really want.

If your goal is to “eat nutritious meals most of the time, and to be in the habit of exercise,” and you are doing that faithfully, then you are living up to that standard, whether you put on size or drop size.

In this case, if you are eating nutritious meals most of the time, and in the habit of exercise, then you can also justify eating a dozen donuts and a large pizza every day and still be living up to your standard. But don’t be disappointed when you’re still looking at the same waistline month after month.

I think we are so afraid of failure, we keep the stakes low. I am here to challenge you to raise your standard for yourself. YOU CAN DO THIS! If you want to wear smaller jeans, first of all admit it. Then set a standard for yourself that is challenging enough to help you move forward, yet reasonable for your life. And then work it.

Your size has nothing to do with who you are, but if you want to make that change, tell the world.

Upping the ante is a bold move; I know it’s an ever-wavering balance of measuring real life with how you want to feel. But I promise, it is the only real way to get where you want to go.

Follow this series of getting and staying motivated to move. Next I will talk about visualizing your success.

Andrea Bowden is a certified health coach and certified personal trainer in Roseburg. She can be reached through www.IAmNextLevelFit.com.

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(1) comment

Mogie

Do you realize that Plan B is the morning after pill? Do you really want to associate abortion with exercise?

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