Youth Climate Change Lawsuit

Youth plaintiff Jacob Lebel, second from right, walks with some of his co-plaintiffs to their hearing in the Juliana v. United States climate change lawsuit at the federal courthouse in Eugene on Wednesday. The constitutional lawsuit was brought by 21 youth against the federal government. The government on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to halt proceedings in a climate-change lawsuit. If allowed to proceed, the trial is scheduled to begin Oct. 29 at the federal courthouse in Eugene.

The Supreme Court Friday lifted a temporary stay on proceedings in the climate trial brought by 21 young plaintiffs.

The trial had been set to start on Monday, but an Oct. 19 order from Chief Justice John Roberts halted the case.

In a three-page order, the Supreme Court denied the stay without prejudice.

The Juliana v. United States case alleges the federal government has violated young people’s constitutional rights through policies that have caused a dangerous climate.

They have said their generation bears the brunt of climate change and that the government has an obligation to protect natural resources for present and future generations.

Saphara Harrell can be reached at 541-957-4216 or sharrell@nrtoday.com. Or on Twitter @daisysaphara.

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Crime and Natural Resources Reporter

Saphara Harrell is the crime and natural resources reporter for The News-Review. She previously worked at The World in Coos Bay. Follow her on Twitter @daisysaphara.

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